My research can be grouped into these primary themes:
Community Resilience in a changing Climate: Wildfires, Tourism, and Adaptive Capacity in BC
Community Resilience in a changing Climate: Wildfires, Tourism, and Adaptive Capacity in BC
  • Every year, natural and human-caused disasters interrupt the lives of millions of people around the world. British Columbia’s historic 2017 wildfire season, now eclipsed by 2018 as the worst fire season on record, resulted in the burning of over 1.2 million hectares of land and the displacement of nearly 65,000 residents. Life-threatening fire hazards also caused enormous damage to local tourism businesses in communities throughout the province, highlighting the pressing need for strategic plans that empower communities to respond. A growing number of academics, community leaders, and governments have prioritized resilience as their development paradigm, with the aim of preparing communities to face such challenges. BC has a successful history developing sustainable and resilient communities. The aim of this research is to build on this legacy by integrating social science research methods and game theoretical frameworks to develop a tourism planning strategy that improves BC communities’ resilience through addressing the ability of individuals, communities, and local tourism businesses to respond to unexpected changes. In the first phase of the project, the socio-economic and environmental situation of several target communities will be studied. Employing a geographic information system (GIS) approach, identified factors will be overlapped with geographic and environmental factors to characterize the regions of the study. A mixed methods approach will then be utilized to study the regions, and factors influencing resilience will be identified to inform the development of a planning framework. Data collected through the first phase will be used as inputs for Game Theory analysis. Strategy development will include economic factors (i.e., constant and non-constant marginal costs), supply functions, social factors (e.g., preferences, motivations, and contextual factors) and environmental elements. Data will be collected from residents, local tourism businesses, and community planners. To date, game theoretical frameworks have not been extensively applied in tourism planning. The proposed research employs social science methods and mathematical models and marries multiple disciplines including tourism, GIS, economics, and community planning to introduce a novel strategy development approach in a tourism context which is expected to benefit several thousand communities in BC and across Canada.

Articles

How much space does nature need?

How much space does nature need?

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Research work


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Researches

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Thesis under my supervision

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